Ayurvedic medicinal herbs grow in pots as they prepare to be placed in your garden.

Ayurvedic Medicinal Herbs You Can Grow (Garden Herbs List)

In the ancient Ayurvedic text books, medicinal herbs like Ashwagandha, mint and holy basil (Tulsi) were described centuries ago. As you know, these herbs are still useful today and the exciting thing is, you can grow these medicinal herbs in your garden. Keep reading for a very special Ayurvedic garden herbs list. Learn how to grow these herbs and what their medicinal properties are.

Here’s an overview of what we’ll cover in this article.

Ayurvedic Medicinal Herbs
Ayurvedic Medicinal Herbs You Can Grow (Garden Herbs List)
Tulsi (Holy Basil)
Ashwagandha
Mint (Pudina)

Ayurvedic Medicinal Herbs

Ayurveda, the science of life or longevity, has a holistic approach to health and disease. It focuses on maintaining and promoting good health and preventing diseases by adopting a healthy lifestyle.

Fresh medicinal herbs are a great source of healthy nutrients. They can change the taste of any food on correct utilization. Herbs have countless advantages and can be grown at home even in a small space.

If you live in an apartment building and don’t have a proper place like a backyard to plant a garden, you can easily grow herbs in your kitchen garden or on a balcony. All you need is a sunny place, an apt container with ample drainage holes which can harbor a plant easily and basics of gardening.

Even if you are a newcomer to medicinal herbs, but have an interest in them then this will be like child’s play to you. Moreover it is an excellent way of getting some physical activity. It is beneficial in relieving stress, educational as well as good fun.

So here are some medicinal herbs from Ayurveda which can be easily grown at home and immensely helpful.

READ MORE: Can Ashwagandha And Tulsi Be Taken Together?, The Sacred Benefits Of Growing Tulsi

Ayurvedic Medicinal Herbs You Can Grow (Garden Herbs List)

Ayurvedic medicinal herbs, garden herbs list.

Tulsi Or Holy Basil

Tulsi is also known as the Mother medicine of nature. Its Sanskrit name translates asThe Incomparable One”. It is cultivated for religious and traditional medicinal purposes on a large scale. In Hinduism, Tulsi is considered the holiest plant and worshipped as a Goddess. Besides these religious facts it is a miraculous drug which has countless medicinal properties.

Tulsi can be easily grown in a pot and for cultivation purpose. Its seeds are easily available in local markets as well as on online.

Tulsi has two main morphological varieties, one with green leaves known as Rama Tulsi and the other with greenish black leaves known as Krishna Tulsi. The properties in both varieties are almost similar.

Ayurvedic Properties Of Tulsi

Rasa or Taste: Tikta (Bitter) and Katu (Pungent).
Guna or Qualities: Laghu (Light) and Rooksha (Dry)
Virya or Potency: Ushna (Hot)
Vipak or taste after digestion: Katu (Pungent)
Prabhava or Special Potency: Krimighana (Anti-microbial properties)
Effect on Dosha: Kapha Vata Shamak, Pitta Vardhini (Pacifies Kapha and Vata Dosha and increases Pitta Dosha)
Parts used: Leaf, Seed, Root, Flower
Botanical name: Ocimum sanctum

Tulsi Uses, According To Eminent Ayurvedic Texts

According to Dhanvantari Nighantu1,2, Tulsi balances Kapha dosha. It is helpful in excessive sputum production and it has antimicrobial properties. It improves taste, alleviates anorexia and improves digestion.

According to the Charak Samhita, Tulsi is useful in the management of hiccups, cough and cold, asthma and chronic respiratory disorders. It alleviates pain in the flanks, aggravates Pitta, pacifies Kapha and Vata, and has aromatic properties.3

According to the Sushruta Samhita, Tulsi pacifies Kapha and Vata dosha, has anti-toxic properties, and is effective in asthma and chronic respiratory disorders. It is good for cough and cold, has aromatic properties, aggravates Pitta and relieves flank pain.4

According to the Bhaav Prakash Nighantu, a revered materia medica of Ayurvedic herbs, Tulsi is pungent and bitter in taste, acts as a cardiac tonic, aggravates heat and Pitta in the body and increases digestive juices in the body. It is helpful in various skin diseases, useful in painful micturition due to various causes, reduces pain in the flanks, pacifies Kapha and Vata.5

Modern Research On Tulsi

Research demonstrates that tulsi has anti stress properties6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13, anti diabetic and glycemic lowering properties6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13, antihypertensive6,10,13, hypolipidemic properties6,7,10,13,14, hepato-protective properties7,9,11,13, fights acne8, anti-cancer properties8,9,11,13, anti-asthmatic properties8,13,antipyretic8,9,13, analgesic8,13, helpful in dental care and oral health8,11, supports eye health8, good source of vitamin K8, anti-microbial9,11,12, anti-inflammatory9,11,13, immunomodulatory activity9,11,13,14, radioprotective activity9,11,13, anti arthritic activity9,13, anti-coagulant activity9,11, natural detoxifying herb12, helpful in eczema, psoriasis and various skin disorders.13

All these facts support a big ‘yes’ to choosing Tulsi to grow in your garden.

Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha is also called Indian ginseng or winter cherry. The  meaning of the word ‘ashwagandha’ is the ‘smell of a horse’. This may be due to its characteristic smell of fresh roots or to its quality of providing the strength of a stallion. Ashwagandha is a miraculous herb and is considered to be nature’s gift to mankind. Besides its use in Ayurvedic, Indian, Unani, siddha and homeopathic medicine, Ashwagandha is also used in traditional African medicine for a variety of ailments.

Ayurvedic Properties of Ashwagandha

Rasa or Taste: Katu (Pungent), Tikta (Bitter) and Kashaya (Astringent)
Guna or Qualities: Laghu (Light) and Snigdha (Unctuous)
Virya or Potency: Ushna (Hot)
Vipak or taste after digestion: Katu (Pungent)
Prabhava or Special Potency: Krimighana (Anti-microbial properties)
Effect on Dosha: Pacifies Kapha and Vata Dosha
Parts used: Leaf, Root, Alkali
Botanical name: Withania somnifera

Ashwagandha Uses, According To Eminent Ayurvedic Texts

According to the Charak samhita, Ashwagandha is Bhrimaneeya which means it improves body mass and nourishment.15It is Balya which means it improves strength and immunity.16 It is useful in asthma and chronic respiratory problems.17 It is helpful in tumor or lump and erysipelas.18 It is helpful in stiffness of the thighs.19

According to Sushruta Samhita, it is used in the treatment of under nutritive conditions and tuberculosis.20

According to Chakra Dutt, it pacifies Vata, is a natural aphrodisiac, improves body nourishment, improves strength and immunity and is useful in abdominal distention, female infertility, malnutrition and emaciation of children.21

According to Dhanvantari Nighantu, it is anti-toxic, helpful in wound healing, provides radiance to the skin, improves semen quality and strength.22

According to Bhav Prakash, it pacifies Vata and Kapha, is anti-inflammatory, useful in leucoderma and helpful in tuberculosis and emaciation. It provides strength, has rejuvenation properties, improves semen quality and quantity and is beneficial in diseases related to the heart.23

According to Shodhal, it is helpful in cysts, lymphadenitis, lymphadenopathy, abdominal problems, inflammatory conditions, worm infestation and female infertility.24

According to Raj Nighantu, it provides strength, relieves Vata and is helpful in cough and cold, asthma and chronic respiratory conditions. It is beneficial for tuberculosis and emaciation and is useful in wound healing.25

According to Raja Martand, it has rejuvenating properties and provides strength.26

According to Vrind, it improves physical strength in children.27

According to Vang Sen, it is useful in lack of sleep or insomnia.28

READ MORE: Ashwagandha Thyroid Benefits: Everything You Need To Know, Ashwagandha Anxiety Relief Remedy That Works, How Ashwagandha Helps PCOS

Modern Research On Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha has anti depressant and anxiolytic effects29,30,31,32,33,34, adaptogenic29,34, insomnia or lack of sleep29,35, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects29,31, anti-tumor and anti-carcinogenic29,31,33,34,36,37,38 effects, cardio protective property.31 It is useful in male infertility39,40,41, female disorders42,43 and has an anti-diabetic effect44,45 It acts as a tonic for generalized weakness, low body weight, emaciation and post convalescent weakness.46 It increases muscle mass29,47, helps in weight loss gained due to stress48, and has immunomodulatory31,34,49 effects and rejuvenating properties.50 It is effective on neurodegenerative diseases51,52,31, has cognition promoting effects29,34,31 and anti-aging effects.49,31

Now these are a great many reasons to grow Ashwagandha in your garden.

Mint (Pudina)

Pudina or mint is a refreshing herb which is widely used for culinary purposes. It also has a number of health benefits. This aromatic plant is a native to cool places, but can be grown easily in any environment. It has many varieties but the two most commonly used varieties are garden mint and spearmint.

Ayurvedic Properties Of Mint (Pudina)

Rasa or Taste: Katu (Pungent)
Guna or Qualities: Laghu (Light), Ruksh (Dry), Teekshan (Strong)
Virya or Potency: Ushna (Hot)
Vipak or taste after digestion: Katu (Pungent)
Effect on Dosha: Pacifies Kapha and Vata Dosha
Parts used: Leaf, Oil Extract
Botanical name: Mentha spicata

Mint Uses According To Eminent Ayurvedic Texts   

According to Ayurveda Vijnana, mint increases the taste perception of food, increases digestive juices and maintains oral hygiene. It pacifies Kapha and Vata dosha, provides strength, and is helpful in nausea and vomiting.53

READ MORE: Vata Diet: Everything You Need To Know, Kapha Diet: Everything You Need To KnowPitta Diet: Everything You Need To Know

Modern Research On Various Mint Species

Research shows that mint has a high content of antioxidants.54,57,62,64 It is useful in common cold54, helpful in digestive issues like flatulence54, indigestion54,60,61, heartburn54, and abdominal pain due to IBS54,56,58,59,60,61, dyspepsia56,58,59, anti-allergic54,55,56,60,61, anti-inflammatory54,55,63, useful in gastric ulcer54 and acts as an analgesic when applied externally.54,55,59,60 It’s a coolant for skin54,55,60, helpful in preventing nipple cracks and nipple pain in first time mothers who are breastfeeding54, is a breath freshener and maintains oral hygiene.54,55,60 It is helpful in reducing postoperative nausea55,60,61, helpful in chemotherapy induced nausea56, antiviral55,56,60,61,62, anti-bacterial55,57,60,61,62,63,64, reduces muscle pain on local application55, is antispasmodic55,58,59,60,64 and has mosquito repellent action.60,61 It is beneficial for hot flashes in women61, treatment of nervous disorders and mental fatigue.61 It has anti-cancer properties 62, anti fungal62,64, pruritus or itching62, antitussive63, antiemetic.64

Mint has various species and you may find different species around your specific territory but its benefits are similar.

With all these possible uses, plant this useful herb in your kitchen garden and reap its benefits.

All herbs should be consumed following the direction of a qualified Ayurvedic practitioner or health care provider. This article is for information purpose only and is not meant to diagnose, treat, mitigate or cure any disease condition.

References
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Alka Sharma graduated in Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) from Dayanand Ayurvedic College, Jalandhar, Punjab, India. She also completed a Masters in Health Care Services. Alka has been practicing as a general Ayurveda practitioner for the last 5 years.

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